Aujourd’hui, c’est le départ du Vendée Globe ! Comment ne pas penser à notre ami Pierrot ? 

Nous nous souvenons de ces moments passés avec lui, qu’il a su animer par ses rires, ses blagues, son humour, son sourire…, sur les pontons du Vendée Globe en particulier avec nos jumeaux de The Witterings.

THANKS A LOT PIERROT ! 

 

Nous vous partageons également une présentation du REMEMBRANCE DAY, expliquée par Sue, notre professeur d’anglais. 

      

  REMEMBRANCE SUNDAY

Remembrance Sunday, the 2nd Sunday in November is the day we remember all the people who were killed or injured from the First World War onwards.

On this day people across the nation stop to reflect on the sacrifices made by our brave Service men and women.

The National Service of Remembrance is held at the Cenotaph in Whitehall every year.

Wreaths of poppies are laid by the Queen and the Royal Family, Members of the Cabinet, Opposition Party Leaders, former Prime Ministers and the Mayor of London.

Also, representatives of the Armed Forces, and Merchant Air and Navy Forces, and High Commissioners from Commonwealth Countries.

There is a two minute silence at 11.00 a.m.

The poppy became a symbol of the Royal British Legion and for many weeks before the 11th November, representatives and helpers are seen everywhere in shops, streets and offices selling this artificial flower for the charity.

The money collected goes to help the veterans,  ex-servicemen and their families.

The poppy became of a symbol because of the terrible fighting in Flanders during the First World War.  Buildings, roads, trees and natural life disappeared leaving a sea of mud and graves for many men.

Only one living thing survived – the poppy flowering each year with the arrival of the warm weather, brought life, hope and colour to those still fighting.

In 1918, Moira Michael, and American, wrote a poem ‘We shall keep the faith’ – she promised to wear a poppy ‘in honour of our dead’.  This became the tradition of wearing the poppy.  The first actual ‘Poppy Day’ was in 1921.

 

 

 

 

 

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